Mosul Residents Begin Repairing Their City Without Waiting For Financial Support

Mosul Residents Begin Repairing Their City Without Waiting For Financial Support

After nine months of fighting, some businessmen in Mosul began rebuilding their shattered premises without waiting for financial support from the cash-strapped Iraqi government or the international community.

Adel Mahmoud, who said he was rebuilding his shop at his own expense, lamented the lack of support.

“We place responsibility on the central government and on the international community because they are not providing support to this destroyed city that is inhabited by more than 4 million people,” Mahmoud added.

Other West Mosul residents have begun clearing rubble from the streets and repairing essential services like power lines and sewage system and with the city back in government's hands, hundreds of people have been heading back to their homes.

Lack of basic services has deterred many others from returning, but Kathem Hussein, who opened a makeshift restaurant serving locals, said life was back to normal and asked people to return to West Mosul.

Before the war, Mosul was Iraq's second-largest city, known for its diversity, religious conservatism and nationalism. After the U.S.-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein in 2003, it became a base for al Qaeda and the Sunni insurgency and then served as the capital of Islamic State's self-declared caliphate in Iraq and Syria for three years.